Archive for the ‘Covanta Violations Lawsuits Fines Threats’ Category

EPA: 6,000 violations at Covanta Incinerator in 2 Years

May 2, 2008
OGDEN MARTIN

(aka Covanta)

is cited by the EPA with over 6,000 permit violations at its 2,300 tons/day municipal waste incinerator in Indianapolis,Indiana.

Start-Up Date: November 1988
Permit violations: June 1989 to May 1991
Owner & Operator: Ogden Martin Systems of Indianapolis
Pollution Controls: Dry Scrubbers, Baghouse
Boiler Manufacturer: Riley Stoker
Builder: J.A. Jones Construction Company
Air Pollution Controls: Environmental Elements Corporation


EPA counted a total of 6,000 violations of Ogden Martin’s incinerator permit limits during a 2 year period from 1989 to 1991 at Ogden’s incinerator in Indianapolis.

Among the violations: Ogden Martin bypassed their pollution controls – scrubbers and baghouse – 18 to 20 times. Ogden’s incinerator had 27 boiler tube failures within one year.

According to an interview with Jeff Stant, the Executive Director of the Hoosier Environmental Council (HEC), the US EPA, the State of Indiana, the City of Indianapolis and HEC, are all currently involved in an official capacity in an enforcement action which is aimed at Ogden Martin’s poorly operated Indianapolis incinerator.

http://www.americanhealthstudies.org/wastenot/wn209.htm

Covanta, Florida: A Decade of Lawsuits.

April 18, 2008

Covanta, Florida: A Decade of Lawsuits. Recycling Undermined.

In Lake County, Florida, an incinerator contract with Covanta in 1991 has caused more than a decade of acrimony, lawsuits and political fallout.

In late 2000, Lake County, Florida commenced a lawsuit in Florida state court against Covanta-Lake, Inc. relating to the waste to energy facility operated by Covanta in Lake County, Florida.

In the lawsuit, the County sought to have its service agreement with Covanta-Lake declared void and in violation of the Florida Constitution.

  • That lawsuit was stayed by the commencement of the (Bankruptcy) Chapter 11 Cases.
  • Lake County subsequently filed a proof of claim seeking in excess of $80 million from Covanta-Lake and Covanta.


More at SEC website, 10-Q Filin
g: http://sec.edgar-online.com/2003/11/14/0000903423-03-000954/Section15.asp

http://www.multinationalmonitor.org/hyper/issues/1993/08/mm0893_09.html
————–
Paying for pollution

Along with the environmental and health risks associated with incineration, taxpayers are forced to bear the considerable financial costs involved in building and operating Ogden facilities. The case of Lake County, Florida offers a dramatic example of the financial toll Ogden can exact from a community. The county’s original 1984 incineration proposal called for General Electric (GE) to design, finance, build and operate a facility, at no cost to the community.

By the time construction began in 1990, however,

  • GE had pulled out of the deal,
  • Ogden was the builder, operator and owner of the incinerator and
  • construction costs had risen to $79 million.
  • In addition, the county is paying the plant’s property taxes.

County Commissioner Richard Swartz says, “We went straight from a situation where Lake County had no financial obligation – zero, none – to a situation where Lake County ended up paying not only for the $79 million in construction costs, but to a total obligation for debt service and operating costs of nearly $300 million over the 22-year life of the Ogden contract.”

Like many communities that have negotiated with Ogden, Lake County locked itself into a “put-or-pay” contract, which forces the county to provide the incinerator with a required tonnage of garbage, or else be charged a penalty. The county is also responsible for disposal of the incinerator ash.

  • Swartz says the Ogden contract has undermined the positive economic and environmental effects of the county’s recycling program.

—————
The city of Tulsa, Okla., had to divert its trash to a landfill in 2003 when Covanta briefly closed its incinerator there, citing financial problems.

.

2006: Covanta Repeatedly Fined for Dioxin Releases, Other Toxins

April 18, 2008


October 9, 2006

In New Jersey, the Covanta company has been REPEATEDLY fined for releasing excessive amounts of dioxin and other toxic emissions from its Essex County plant.

In the past year, New Jersey regulators have ordered Covanta to pay more than $112,000 in fines for violations at ALL three of its waste-to-energy plants in the state.

The Rutgers Environmental Law Center at Rutgers University in New Jersey has filed a notice of its intent to sue Covanta over repeated Clean Air Act violations at the Essex plant, the state’s largest garbage incinerator.
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By SCOTT HARPER and tim mcglone
The Virginian-Pilot
http://hamptonroads.com/node/165361

Dodge City: Covanta Violations Just Before Bankruptcy. Court Order Required to Enforce Environment Standards.

April 18, 2008
ENFORCEMENT ACTION ORDER BY CONSENT ISSUED TO
Covanta Alexandria / Arlington, Inc

11. … Termination of this Order, or any obligation imposed in this Order, shall not operate to relieve Covanta from its obligation to comply with any statute, regulation, permit condition, other order, certificate, certification, standard, or requirement otherwise applicable.
——————–

SECTION D: Agreement and Order

… In addition, the Board hereby enters an order imposing upon Covanta Alexandria / Arlington, Inc., a civil charge of Fourteen Thousand Six Hundred Ninety Five Dollars ($14,695.00), the payment of which shall be subject to the terms and conditions of Covanta’s confirmed plan of reorganization.

—————————
6. On January 3, 2002 at 0950 hrs. EST, Mr. George Ball-Llovera contacted NVRO to report a malfunction that resulted in a 4-hour exceedance of the carbon monoxide limit set forth in the air permit.

During that call Mr. Ball-Llovera was informed that Covanta needed to provide quarterly EER’s for the facility in addition to the Annual and Semi-Annual reports. Mr. Ball-Llovera indicated that he would provide the required documents. At 1440 hrs. EST, Mr. Ball-Llovera again contacted NVRO personnel to say that by January 31, 2002 the Annual Report and the 4th Quarter EER would be provided to NVRO and that the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Quarter 2001 EER’s would be provided soon after.


12. On February 25, 2002 Mr. George Ball-Llovera hand delivered the 3rd quarter 2001 EER for Covanta to the NVRO.

13. On April 1, 2002 Covanta filed a voluntary petition under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. (“Bankruptcy Court”)

Covanta Threatened Canadian Doctors Against Incinerator?

April 16, 2008

A committee consisting of Orillia’s 54 doctors generated a report, based on extensive research of published health data, that recommended a rejection of the incinerator proposal: 52 (and later, 53) of the doctors endorsed the report.

Dr. Don Philpott, a member of the committee, noted that: “People can be bamboozled into thinking that acceptable risk means no additional risk, but that is just not true…

In retaliation for the call to reject the incinerator’s installation, Ogden Martin threatened to sue the doctors of Orillia for defamation.

The Ontario Medical Association (OMA) passed a resolution in support of the Orillia doctors, after which the threat of litigation was dropped.

The Ontarion Ministry of Environment under the NDP government banned the development of new municipal solid waste incinerators and enacted stricter standards for existing incinerators. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orillia,_Ontario]

In 1992 the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cited Ogden Martin (now Covanta) for 6,000 violations between 1989 and 1991 at its Indianapolis incinerator alone.

OGDEN MARTIN

is cited by the EPA with over 6,000 permit violations at its 2,300 tpd municipal waste incinerator in Indianapolis,Indiana.

Start-Up Date: November 1988
Permit violations: June 1989 to May 1991
Owner & Operator: Ogden Martin Systems of Indianapolis
Pollution Controls: Dry Scrubbers, Baghouse
Boiler Manufacturer: Riley Stoker
Builder: J.A. Jones Construction Company
Air Pollution Controls: Environmental Elements Corporation

EPA counted a total of 6,000 violations of Ogden Martin’s incinerator permit limits during a 2 year period from 1989 to 1991 at Ogden’s incinerator in Indianapolis. Among the violations: Ogden Martin bypassed their pollution controls – scrubbers and baghouse – 18 to 20 times. Ogden’s incinerator had 27 boiler tube failures within one year. According to an interview with Jeff Stant, the Executive Director of the Hoosier Environmental Council (HEC), the US EPA, the State of Indiana, the City of Indianapolis and HEC, are all currently involved in an official capacity in an enforcement action which is aimed at Ogden Martin’s poorly operated Indianapolis incinerator. [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orillia,_Ontario , http://www.americanhealthstudies.org/wastenot/wn209.htm%5D

==============

Covanta Energy Corporation was formerly known as Ogden Martin.
CHWMEG Report Number: H482.2
http://www.chwmeg.org/asp/search/detail.asp?ID=466
http://www.secinfo.com/d2851.bd.5.htm
http://www.secinfo.com/dsvr4.138e.htm#7psh

Covanta Bankruptcy: On December 2, 2003, DHC executed a definitive investment and purchase agreement to
acquire the energy and water businesses of Covanta in connection with Covanta's emergence from Chapter 11
proceedings in bankruptcy
http://www.secinfo.com/dsvr4.138e.htm#1stPage